What does the term " very first world country " mean to you?

11 answers · 1 week ago

Answers

Social mobility, fair access to employment, human rights, good healthcare, freedom from tyranny and oppression, freedom of the press and freedom of expression, basic standards of education for boys and girls, effective public services and support infrastructure, local economies, welfare support, thriving industrial climate, political influence on a global level
Anonymous · 1 week ago
Unlike a third world country.
Progressive, humanitarian, understanding, willing to help the poor, willing to pay for its citizens' education and healthcare, not afraid to tax the rich, not afraid to legislate worker's rights, willing to maintain and/or modernize the infrastructure.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
A country that has a democratic political system, a relatively developed economy, and enforces fundamental human rights.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
Close to a developed country, but still a shithole.

Close, but no cigar.
In the ballpark, but still not a home run.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
I would write it as "first-world country" I have never previously seen that expression used as an adjective. A "first-world country" is one with an advanced economy and advanced political system, and advanced social system and similar manifestations of "grown up " living.

So in using "very first-world country" adjectivally presumably the writer was saying that the item or habits referred to are those of an advanced country, not those of a "developing country" or (in older, less politically-correct parlance) a "third-world country" such as SOME of those in Africa and Asia.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
Great Britain
Anonymous · 1 week ago
America.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
Used to mean the USA.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
Having a national health service.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
It's a political term.

"More than half a century ago, the Cold War was just starting. It was Western capitalism versus Soviet socialism. But there was another group of countries. Many of them were former colonies. None of them were squarely in either the Western or the Soviet camp. Thinking of these three factions, French demographer Alfred Sauvy wrote of "Three worlds, one planet" in an article published in L'Observateur in 1952.

The First World consisted of the U.S., Western Europe and their allies. The Second World was the so-called Communist Bloc: the Soviet Union, China, Cuba and friends. The remaining nations, which aligned with neither group, were assigned to the Third World."

Now those countries formerly referred to as "third world" are called developing countries. The US has fallen so far in global power and prestige that it can no longer be referred to as "first world," and its alliances are now unstable or shifting. And the Communist bloc no longer exists. So the terminology is obsolete, except for Cold War history.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
high-income countries
Anonymous · 1 week ago