What could potentially kill or weaken a star?

13 answers · 1 week ago

Answers

Amount of iron in its core
Anonymous · 1 week ago
Time.
Anonymous · 6 days ago
time
Anonymous · in 24 hours
Only Chuck Norris has that power
Anonymous · 1 day ago
First I require to know the proposed defination of "star",,The 'star" labeled name ,the question reason and question defination of"kill/weaken"
Anonymous · 5 days ago
A closely orbiting black hole.
Anonymous · 5 days ago
Whatever it is, you're going to need a LOT of it. Pushing Jupiter into the Sun wouldn't do much as it's only a thousandth of the Sun's mass and its gases would be recycled quickly. A star or black hole swinging past might tear it apart with tidal forces.

It might be fun to consider some of the fictional star-killing scenarios listed here on TV Tropes: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/M...
Anonymous · 6 days ago
Age.
Anonymous · 5 days ago
A closely orbiting dense-matter object, such as a white dwarf, neutron star or black hole, can siphon away the outer layers of a star, reducing the star's mass, and thus making its own self-gravitational hold on itself even weaker. This cycle will continue until the entire star gets siphoned away or it becomes sufficiently dense itself to avoid being torn apart by its Roche limit.

For a white dwarf and a neutron star, there is an upper limit of the amount of mass that can be siphoned away before those dense bodies can't siphon any more away. For a white dwarf that is the Chandrasekhar Limit (approx. 1.4 solar masses), which once it reaches that limit, it blows itself up completely as a Type Ia supernova, scattering all of its pieces out to the universe again. For a neutron star, that limit is thought to be about 2.2 solar masses, beyond which it turns into an even denser black hole. There is no limit for a black hole size.
Anonymous · 6 days ago
Many binary systems consist of a star and a neutron star or a white dwarf, instead of just the usual two stars orbiting each other. The neutron star or white dwarf will pull mass from the star, thus weakening the latter.
Anonymous · 1 week ago
Falling into a black hole, being shredded by it.
Merging with another star that it has been orbiting. While a new star is created out of the two, the originals are not there anymore. This has been observed through gravity pulses detectors.
Supernova.
If enough time passes, even a brown dwarf star will decay into a cinder, thus killing its radiation output.
Anonymous · 6 days ago
Running out of fuel
Happens to us all
Anonymous · 1 week ago
gravity
Anonymous · 1 week ago